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OFTC selects its EAGLE winner for 2014

OFTC selects its EAGLE winner for 2014

Nathaniel Ebner of Glascock County has been chosen to represent Oconee Fall Line Technical College (OFTC) at the EAGLE Leadership Institute on March 25 - 27, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. 

EAGLE is the first statewide program in the nation that recognizes and rewards excellence among students enrolled in adult education programs. This student recognition program is designed to create greater awareness of educational opportunities that are available in local communities across the state and to foster greater involvement in lifelong learning pursuits.

Students at OFTC were nominated for the local EAGLE award by their instructors based on a demonstration of superior achievement in the adult education programs.

OFTC selected Ebner out of a group of nine finalists from across the College's 11-county service area who each gave an interview about their studies, progress, hopes, and dreams and a short, prepared speech.

Area students invited to enter design contest

Area students invited to enter design contest

Oconee Fall Line Technical College is encouraging all area elementary, middle and high school art instructors and their students to participate in Georgia's annual Manufacturing Appreciation Week (MAW) student design competition.

Winners have the opportunity to win cash awards and attend the Manufacturing Appreciation Week luncheon in Atlanta with the Governor.

Students from across Georgia are encouraged to submit artwork depicting the importance of manufacturing to their lives and communities as part of Manufacturing Appreciation Week (MAW). MAW was developed by the Technical College System of Georgia and the Georgia Department of Economic Development.

The deadline to enter the student design competition is February 7, 2013 and all entries should be submitted to Oconee Fall Line Technical College, Attention Jennifer Ahrens, Exec. Director of Marketing and Public Relations, 1189 Deepstep Road, Sandersville, GA 31082.

OFTC commemorates Veterans Day

OFTC commemorates Veterans Day

Veterans of all ages either attending or working at Oconee Fall Line Technical College (OFTC) attended a celebration in their honor at the College's Dublin campus.

Students from all OFTC campuses (Dublin, Sandersville, Louisville, Helena, Eastman) were invited to attend the celebration hosted by the college's Student Government Association (SGA). The event also included a special speaker, U.S. Representative John Barrow from Georgia's 12th district.

While Veterans Day honors all American veterans for their dedicated and loyal service to their country, the faculty, staff and students of OFTC wanted veterans to know that they deeply appreciate the sacrifices they have made in their lives to keep our country free.

OFTC Holds Fall 2013 Commencement Ceremony

OFTC Holds Fall 2013 Commencement Ceremony

SANDERSVILLE, GA - Oconee Fall Technical College (OFTC) held its fall commencement ceremony on Thursday, October 24, 2013 at its North Campus in Sandersville for students completing their associate of applied science degree, diploma or technical certificate of credit during the 2013 calendar year.

This was the College's first ceremony in its newest addition, the Ben J. Tarbutton, Jr. Business Development Center.

Keynote speaker and Representative Mack Jackson, Georgia House District 128, addressed the graduating class at OFTC.

Of the 137 students who completed an associated of applied science degree, diploma or technical certificate at OFTC during the 2013 summer semester, 42 participated in commencement. 41 of all the graduates were honor graduates.

Graduates attended classes online or at one OFTC’s campuses in Sandersville, Dublin, Louisville, Helena or Eastman.

Starting College on the Right Key

Starting College on the Right Key

Today, computers are used in almost every aspect of our life. Students in school or college use computers, most businesses use computers extensively in the office and on the manufacturing line, and people use computers every day to surf the internet, email friends, or shop!

At Oconee Fall Line Technical College (OFTC), all Diploma and Associate of Applied Science Degree students are required to take the course COMP 1000 - Introduction to Computers. The faculty at OFTC know that computers are used in the classroom extensively, and it is in a student's best interest to start off their college career computer literate.

Computer literacy is about learning the basics — how to save and open a file, how to use a word processing program, and how to send and receive email — for starters. It means having some sort of level of comfort around computers rather than a look of fear and a feeling of foreboding.

Opportunity, Variety and Experience Add Up

Opportunity, Variety and Experience Add Up

Add up all the opportunities the study of accounting can lead to and you get the solution for an exciting career!

"Accounting is a subject taught in most all business programs. It lays the foundation for solid, fiscal management and understanding, a recipe for success in every business," said OFTC Accounting Instructor Dr. Stan Lawson.

Practical application of the subject is also important. 

"OFTC requires a two-pronged learning approach for all students. It is the combination of understanding and implementing their subject," continued Dr. Lawson. "Accounting can be a difficult subject to digest without a great deal of practice. It's not enough to read and understand. Our students leave each class with the ability 'to do'".

As financial regulations become stricter, there will be greater demand in every business field for workers to maintain books and provide accounting services.

CIS Students at OFTC Begin With Computer Concepts

CIS Students at OFTC Begin With Computer Concepts
640K ought to be enough for anybody.              - Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, 1981 

Today's computers are well beyond storage capacities measured in kilobytes (K or KB). Storage today on personal computers is measured in terabytes (TB).  Comparing kilobytes (K or KB) to terabytes (TB) is vastly differentl - 1 TB equals 1,073,741,824 KB. It just doesn't register in today's world with streaming data and video. If that seems large, think about servers whose storage can be measured in zettabytes (ZB) - equaling 1,152,921,504,606,846,976 KB. That's a big number.

And that's the beauty of Computer Information Systems (CIS) education. It's a field that changes constantly, is ever growing, and is high demand for jobs.